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LBACA

 

Community Perspectives

"What happens if these projects are built   and the ports fail to achieve the levels of emissions reductions they're promising?

"Already, we have higher rates of asthma     in Long Beach than in Los Angeles     County [as a whole] or even statewide.

"There's so much fog and murkiness    around their rosy predictions
.

"They say growing green means expanding terminals and putting more trucks on the road. What's cleaner about that?                It's not logical."

- Elina Green, Project Manager at the Long Beach Alliance for Children with Asthma

Source: Sahagun, Louis. "Port complex aspires to be bustling, clean." Los Angeles Times. 28 May 2007.

 

Community Perspectives

"Rumble, rumble. That’s the hum of my community, so close to the nation’s largest port complex. The air tickles your throat, but my daughter and I are not laughing. We’ve been living in Long Beach for ten years. The doctor first diagnosed her with asthma when she was six. It’s been traumatizing to watch my child suffer.

"Through my involvement with the Long Beach Alliance for Children with Asthma, I’ve learned about managing my child’s asthma, including controlling triggers inside the home. Unfortunately, it’s impossible to control the environment outside, when you live next to the largest fixed source of air pollution in greater Los Angeles.

"I believe there are solutions to these problems. I don’t believe industry’s claim that reducing pollution will hurt our economy. These companies make a lot of money while I spend money on medicine and miss work and my daughter misses school."

-Oti Nungaray, Long Beach resident and LBACA "A-Team" member

Source: "Paying with Our Health: The Real Cost of Freight Transport in California." A Ditching Dirty Diesel Collaborative Report by the Pacific Institute. November 2006.

 

Long Beach Alliance for Children with Asthma (LBACA)

Long Beach

 

The Long Beach Alliance for Children with Asthma (LBACA) is a broad-based community coalition working towards changing the profile of childhood asthma in the cities of Long Beach, Carson, San Pedro, and Wilmington through improved health care delivery and quality, outreach, education, support systems, and living environments and through changes in policy at all levels. LBACA reaches out to parents of children with asthma with best practice asthma management information, and also helps develop policies to protect children.

LBACA has trained, under direction from USC, a group of community mothers of children with asthma in particulate matter monitoring and traffic counting as means to engage community members in policy work around air pollution from goods movement and health.  LBACA’s Neighborhood Assessment Team, or “A-team,” has  been engaged in making public comments and doing presentations in many unique ways.  Because the current A-team members are highly trained and competent in giving presentations on the health impacts of goods movement, they have been presented with numerous high profile opportunities.  First, National Public Radio’s Marketplace Report is producing a story on the impact that globalization is having on local communities.  Two A-Team members were interviewed with their children for the story to be aired in November 2007.  An A-Team member’s story was also taped and aired on Telemundo’s Spanish television. Finally, at a local industry-driven conference called “Faster Freight Cleaner Air,” a LBACA A-Team member was the featured participant in a keynote panel discussion to share her perspective on how the “goods movement industry” has impacted her health and well-being.  She was the only community member asked to make a presentation at the conference.  LBACA’s A-Team members have also used their skills to give an “Asthma and Air Pollution 101” presentation for LBACA’s “Health and Housing” community members.   

In order to expand the A-Team activities, LBACA decided that new recruits would benefit from leadership training focused on policy and advocacy work.  LBACA enrolled 12 new community members in a newly designed “Health Leadership Training,” which includes public health, public speaking, advocacy and community organizing, and conflict resolution. 

It is these and other efforts that has enabled LBACA to engage community members in the dialogue of goods movement and health as it impacts their lives and the lives of their children.

 

 

 

Elina Green, Project Manager for the Long Beach Alliance for Children with Asthma came to Long Beach from Atlanta, GA where she completed a Masters in Public Health at Emory University. Her background in community service for children started with the completion of two years of AmeriCorps National Service with a children’s psychiatric hospital in rural Georgia. Following her own service, she began working in environmental health as the Program Manager for her own AmeriCorps program with the Atlanta Outward Bound Center. Her commitment to serving the underserved and working towards equality in health is being realized through the work of the Long Beach Alliance for Children with Asthma.

 

 

Cynthia Romo, Asthma Outreach and Education Coordinator, has worked at LBACA for two years.  First as an Assistant Evaluator working together with the Community Health Workers during home visits. She then moved into her current position coordinating the Neighborhood Assessment Team (A-TEAM) projects such as traffic counting, particulate matter monitoring, and other related air pollution activities.  In addition, she works with community members in workgroups regarding health and housing activities. Cynthia graduated from CSULB in 2005 with a Bachelor’s of Arts in Anthropology and Chicano Latino Studies with a Health Care Administration certificate. She is interested in social equality for all communities, especially regarding environmental justice.

 

 

Contact Information:

Long Beach Alliance for Children with Asthma (LBACA)
2651 Elm Ave, Ste 100
Long Beach CA 90806
(562) 427-4249
www.lbaca.org

 

Maintained by the Trade, Health & Environment Impact Project